New Technology
Talon's objective is to become a leader in advanced metal matrix composite products and establish significant market share and brand awareness for Talbor® in niche markets, such as higher-priced consumer products and specialized uses, where value-added premiums can be obtained. It intends to do so by capitalizing on its existing proprietary technology and patented process for producing Talbor® through the direct manufacture and sale of Talbor®-based products to industrial and consumer product manufacturers and distributors, and, to a lesser extent, to producers of military products.

The Company believes that its focus on marketing Talbor® for use in higher-priced consumer and commercial products and applications where its properties are critical will enable it to achieve a significant and profitable market penetration.


Products
Talbor® is a new metal matrix composite material, with the principal constituents being boron carbide and aluminum. Talbor®'s composition and method of manufacture gives it lightweight, high resistance to wear, great stiffness, and high strength. Talbor®'s density is 60% that of titanium with a specific stiffness 60% higher. Likewise, Talbor®'s density is roughly one-third that of steel with a specific stiffness 30% higher. Talbor® exhibits surface hardness higher than titanium and comparable to many steels. Talbor® withstands corrosion far better than aluminum in standard salt water corrosion tests, losing only 0.5% of its mass, compared with 3.5% for aluminum. The following sets forth some of the advantages of Talbor® compared with more traditional, as well as more exotic, commercially available metallic alloys.

Increased Strength
Talbor®'s specific strength (strength divided by density) compares favorably with other materials. Talbor®'s specific strength, depending on the material used, can be as high as 918 (103 lb./cubic inch), compared with titanium 6A1-4V's 800 and aluminum 6061-T6's 408. The density of Talbor® is less than that of many alloys and metals; some comparisons are as follows: Talbor® - 0.098 (lb./cubic inch); titanium 6A1 4V - 0.160; aluminum 6061-T6 - 0.102; and 17-4 steel - 0.283. As boron carbide is added to aluminum titanium or magnesium, the composite's density decreases compared with the original metal alloy. Such a quality leads to the ability to increase specific strength while lowering the weight of many metal components and products.

Stiffness
Talbor® also offers a substantial stiffness advantage over materials such as titanium, steel and aluminum. Specific stiffness is measured by dividing the tension modulus by the density. Talbor® has a specific stiffness of 145 (106 psi/cubic inch) compared to 106 for steel, 103 for titanium, and 102 for aluminum. Because of its significantly increased strength and specific stiffness compared to aluminum, for many applications far less Talbor® material is needed to provide equivalent properties, which can translate into a net weight reduction of 35% to 40% over aluminum for a given product.




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Hardness
Talbor®'s hardness is comparable to and can be somewhat higher than steel and titanium depending on the formulation. Typical hardness comparisons are as follows: Talbor®- 80 (Rockwell B standard); 17 4 steel 76; titanium 73. The Company can supply Talbor® in ingot and extrusion forms and in final shapes. Talbor® also has excellent brazing and welding capabilities. Talbor® is available in various grades for different applications. Talbor®'s properties can be altered on a limited basis by changing the percentage amount of boron carbide, as well as that of the base alloy material, depending on the requirements of the application. The properties of interest, with different priorities for each application, include weight, strength, stiffness, hardness, fracture resistance, corrosion resistance, ability to be welded, ability to be machined, thermal expansion, and electrical resistivity.


All of these properties can be customized within certain limitations. For example, in aerospace applications, where thermal expansion is a problem due to the extremes of the environment, the percentage of boron carbide can be increased to 30% (or more) to lower the thermal expansion; for transducers. The electrical resistivity can be lowered by decreasing the boron carbide to a few percentage points; for better wearability on tools, 20% to 25% boron carbide can be used for harder surfaces; for higher corrosion resistance, corrosion-resistant materials can be added; and if weight is a critical factor, lower density can be achieved by adding lightweight elements such as magnesium, lithium, and silicon, creating lighter and easily extrudable material, but with less strength.


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BUSINESS - Industry Overview
Advanced composite materials began to be used in the 1960's, initially in military and aerospace applications where their high cost and initial fabrication difficulties were outweighed by their physical advantages. As familiarity with composites increased and their advantages for commercial applications became more evident, supply increased, as did demand, and composites came into widespread use for commercial and, to some extent, consumer applications. Composites now give the engineer the freedom to design materials to suit the specific needs of the structure or component with strength-to-weight ratios and specific stiffness ratios greater than those of many of the best metal alloys. Composites are currently replacing many traditional materials. The worldwide market for composite materials (including military applications) in 2005 was estimated at approximately [source] $10.3 billion in sales, of which approximately $4 billion represented sales in North America. (U.S. department of commerce) It is estimated that by the year 2005, sales of composite materials worldwide will reach approximately $16 billion, of which approximately $7.2 billion will represent, sales in North America.

The growth of interest in metal matrix composites is a result of the engineering properties of these composites. Metal matrix composites are light in weight and have good stiffness and strength, low density, good high temperature capabilities, and low thermal expansion. Based on independent studies, the Company believes these materials can provide up to 60% savings in weight compared to traditional metallic alloys while still retaining key properties.

They also compare favorably with certain other composite materials, namely polymer-matrix materials that have temperature and strength limitations, are sensitive to moisture and in some cases also release gases or moisture. The Company believes that cost is a significant concern regarding future applications of metal matrix composites. Over the past 20 years, metal matrix composites have undergone rapid market development from applications where initially cost was secondary and strength and lightweight were critical. The Company believes lower costs can be achieved based on recent developments and higher production rates, and that the potential market for metal matrix composites will, therefore, be materially expanded.
Talbor® Metal Matrix Composite Strategy
Talon Composites will target Lightweight metal and metal alloy products for premium-priced consumer products and for specialized uses are among the higher-value products produced by the metallic-based materials industry. Talon's objective is to become a leader in advanced metal matrix composite products and establish significant market share and brand awareness for Talbor® in niche markets, such as higher-priced consumer products and specialized uses, where value-added premiums based on its superior properties can be obtained. It intends to do so by capitalizing on its existing proprietary technology and patented process for producing Talbor® through the direct manufacture and sale of Talbor®-based products to industrial and consumer product manufacturers and distributors.

Marketing and Distribution
The Company is focusing its initial marketing efforts on the use of Talbor® in applications where its unique combination of properties will justify an appropriate price premium. These applications include: (i) high end sporting goods such as golf club heads and shafts, premium priced lightweight bicycle frames and components, and racquets; (ii) automotive applications; and (iii) nuclear shielding for both disposal containers and reactor installations. Other potential applications of Talbor® include its use in marine structural applications; armor for government and military vehicles and for personal protection; structural components for aircraft; automotive and motorcycle components; portable power tools; medical applications such as braces and wheelchairs; and satellite components. Since 1999, the Company's claims with respect to the superior physical characteristics of Talbor® have been supported by studies and testing, performed by third parties, of its various properties such as strength, homogeneity, hardness, density, stiffness, fracture resistance, resonance and neutron absorption. The Company has established offices in the U.K. United States, Mexico, Japan and Italy.


Research and Development
The Company continuously engages in the development of new products and improvements to its existing formulations and maintains laboratory facilities for these purposes as well as a network of outside independent test laboratories and specialty subcontractors. Current research and development effort is focused on various applications for cast and extruded Talbor® products, and the tooling and methods for product production. It is expected that formulations and techniques will continue to be developed and refined through empirical tests and prototype development.

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